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World Series Fun: Yankees-Phillies, 1950 World Series

We began the postseason with eight possible World Series rematches and, though most of those disappeared in the first round, we’ve somehow wound up with one anyway. When the Phillies and Yankees meet in Game 1 of the Fall Classic on Wednesday, it’ll be the second time the two franchises have squared off with the World Championship on the line. The last time they met was in 1950, when the Whiz Kids were swept by the Yanks in a low-scoring Series. It was the second of five consecutive world titles for the Yanks. As the defending World Champs, you can bet the 2009 Phils are expecting a different outcome this year. Whatever the case, it should be a fun Series (as long as you can get past Fox overplaying the whole Philadelphia/New York City angle).

In honor of this World Series rematch, I’ve pulled out a couple of things to remember the 1950 Fall Classic. Above is an ad from a 1951 Life magazine issue (click on it to be taken to the issue). In the ad, Philly Manager of the Year Ed Sawyer & MVP closer Jim Konstanty and Yankees’ ace Vic Raschi (along with Cleveland’s Bob Lemon) remind you that “With Baseball’s Big Winners, It’s Cool, Mild Camels!” Just listen to what Sawyer had to say: “Like most of the boys on my team, I smoke Camels. My own 30-Day Camel Mildness Test proved to me how mild a cigarette can be!”

How can you pass up a pitch like that?

(Click “Read More” to continue reading… and for some video fun!)

And below, enjoy this brief little recap of the 1950 Series, produced as the two squads were preparing for the 1951 season. It’s always great to see video from those mid-century World Series. Who would’ve thought that it wouldn’t be for another 60 years before the two teams met again?



Larry Granillo

About Larry Granillo

Larry Granillo has been writing Wezen Ball since 2008 and has dealt with such touchy topics as Charlie Brown's baseball stats and Ferris Bueller's day off. In 2010, he got the bright idea to time every home run trot in baseball; he has been missing ever since.

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